The Workers’ Rebellion and The Great Facade: A Brief History of Viktorium (Part IV of V)

by Benoît Laurent

IT BEGAN IN MUCH THE SAME way as it ended—as Shakespeare would say, ‘a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing’. New arrivals to our Viktorium will quickly come to find that this view of the Workers’ Rebellion is rarely contested, even amongst the most liberal of our citizens. Was it a good thing? A bad thing? No one quite knows the correct answer. But what we can be sure of is that it was most certainly a disorganized event.

The sentiments were all there—anger at a sudden drop in wages, DuPont’s unexpected nomination of the controversial Marco Corcini as Minister of Defense (who quickly set up armed checkpoints to keep the working class at bay as Parisian upper-class arrivals were given preferential housing in the Metropoliès), the gentrification of inner city blocks which once housed an array of successful small business—but the labor revolts largely lacked organization from anyone who might serve as a competent leader. The exact reasons for this are unclear, though considering the radically opposing views among the two strongest voices of the working class, it is suspected that a corporate shill was planted from the outset to dissuade a revolution.

In essence, the war was over long before it began. And DuPont’s carefree ideals, it seemed, had already been corrupted. But of course that was not enough for the Parisian ruling class. They had invested their money from the moment of their arrival in all the best markets, biding their time until they could seize control of the capital. The Workers’ Rebellion provided just the right momentum to that end, culminating in the overthrow of DuPont. With him gone, they could then blame the most radical changes—their changes—on his leadership and install a new president, one who promised the people greater progressive change and a more competitive edge against the rising province of Sereinnes in the east.

Not everyone under the thumb of the bourgeoisie cooperated as expected, however. At least five Dispatcher units during that time went rogue to help those in the Mendrés District find shelter in a series of underground tunnels during the worst of the labor riots on the streets above. Several leading Republican Council members even supplied them a layout stolen from a top secret archive. If the battle were to move underground, there were certain safe areas and exits rumored to exist outside the city walls. In addition to this, they were also supplied a new form of camouflage—naturally, courtesy of Tesla—which mimicked the frequency of anomalies and rendered civilians invisible to detection by Corcini’s soldiers. All of this worked out well for many civilians who sought refuge below; that is, for everyone who didn’t find themselves trapped in the southeast junction.

A man by the name of Pontius Proulx—then a General of the Dispatchers and loyal to Corcini—had gotten his hands on the blueprints for the underground subway system at the last moment. Knowing he would not have enough time to break in and round up escaping rioters on his own, he made the decision to rupture a main water line using phase units and flood the tunnels in the southeast corridor to flush them out. This worked quite well to his advantage as those who fled made their way back out onto the streets above and straight into a blockade where his men waited to take them into custody.

In the end, the workers and any other civilians who joined in the fight barely made it up to the Charleville District just outside the Metropoliès. Buildings were bombed out from the north gate up to the edge of the Barreau block, more for scare tactics than anything else. Many were wounded or lost limbs in the fight; reckless as Pontius and his loyal squads were, they still followed the ‘no kill’ decree laid down by DuPont. Nevertheless, their photos were printed in every major news publication in Viktorium, including right here at the Free Press. The stage of revolution had been set. The dissenters were captured and branded as political terrorists, their industries bankrupted and forced under to be replaced by the new. The families of those who marched soon found themselves forced into a life of squalor and constant surveillance. There was no turning back. The bourgeoisie had to make a show of power however they could, a ruse which many argue still persists to this day.

Governor Saunier’s election to public office following the exile of Charles DuPont was a much celebrated affair by Cavarice citizens. His rhetoric on the campaign trail was as progressive as they come. Having won the Radical Party’s nomination, and later the general election by an unexpected landslide against his weaker conservative opponent Louis Roche, it seemed nothing could stand in the way of returning Viktorium to its former glory. Nothing, that is, aside from the Republican Council, who—with paid delegates under the financial influence of the bourgeoisie—successfully had their term limits extended from five years to ten. Governor terms are still five. This meant they could easily subvert the will of any governor in office until 1925, thus rendering neutral any progressive changes proposed by either Saunier or Mayor LaCour, or even their next successors—to say nothing of checks and balances. Goodbye, socialism!

The Facade

Of course you know the old adage, ‘be careful what you wish for’. DuPont wanted a utopian society, and it backfired. But as far as keeping up a show? It appears to have worked remarkably well. Indeed, the supreme irony of it all is that the vast majority of the general public still blindly accepts and believes in Cavarice, even the whole of Viktorium at large, as a place that can be saved with the proper leadership.

Perhaps it is because no one is afforded a choice otherwise of whether or not they wish to come here; DuPont saw to that himself from the very beginning. Making Viktorium into a tourist destination and painting it with the brush of glamour would only work for so long, and he knew this.

The plan was first laid out in 1900 when he first met Nikola Tesla at the Paris Exposition Universelle. The two spoke of innovation. Charles had just proven the existence of an alternate accessible dimension with his latest equations, and he sold his ideas well. Over the next seven years, they corresponded frequently regarding the construction of a compact radio frequency alternator that would automatically scan and collect specific electrical wavelengths—human ‘souls’—and transmit them safely to Viktorium, where they would then be reorganized into their prior form (or at least into a body resembling something close to their original). They did not meet again until DuPont perfected his first ghost machine in 1907 following his test runs in the French countryside.

Together at approximately four in the morning on the 8th of April, they ascended the stairs to the top of the Eiffel Tower, where they climbed out onto the rafters and placed the beacon well out of sight. Tesla was reportedly hesitant to activate such a device; Gustave Eiffel was known to run various experiments from his tower, and he feared there may be too much interference. Being the ever-persuasive one, DuPont of course insisted. The two then left and parted their respective ways. Monitoring the device or changing batteries was not necessary; the tower itself functioned as a lightning rod, and as such would continue to power the alternator indefinitely.

The next night, DuPont paid a visit to Viktorium and discovered a new population of nine thousand waiting just outside the walls of Cavarice. The beacon had worked. This was not quite the perfect number he had hoped for, though certainly close enough to raise the population of his capital city quickly. In his journals, he noted that a wave of confusion had come over the crowd as he began to address them from the wall:

It was as if they were seeing God for the first time in all of his glory. Bewildered expressions befell the sea of unknown faces before me. There were whispers of heaven amongst the Christians, atheists whose legs threatened to give way at any moment, Muslims who bowed in surrender. They could not believe this grand spectacle. Neither, for that matter, could I. As a scientist, I have seen many an occurrence which I could not explain. The arrival of that first crowd was by far the most humbling experience of my life. And I hadn’t a clue what to tell them.

Did they believe me to be God? Was this golden wall in the middle of the desert some equivalent to their idea of what stood at the entrance to heaven? What would happen if I allowed them into my city? These were things I should have considered at the beginning. Back then, there was no Office of Immigration Affairs. There was no railway system. All I had with me at that moment were my loyal squad of Dispatchers, Karl Richter, and Constance Renou. The city, of course, behind me. But I couldn’t open the door just yet. Something inside was stopping me. I had to address them.

“Welcome, friends,” I said, clearing my throat. “Welcome to Viktorium. This…is your city!” And to my surprise, a small group of them answered.

“To Viktorium!” They said. “Viktorium, Viktorium!”

The rest of the crowd joined in the chant until I waved my hand to silence them.

“I know this is not quite what you were expecting after leaving your families. But if we work hard here, we’ve all got a chance to build something. Every man gets his share! And so I welcome you, friends and fellow countrymen, to the afterlife! Viktorium! To victory!”

One of my Dispatchers handed me a small flask as they began to chant again, and I raised it high. It was a gesture most of them seemed to recognize. And as I downed that first stale shot of whiskey while they cheered and jumped about in adoration and excitement, it was then that I realized what I had done.

As I stepped down from the precipice and told Richter to open the gate, Constance took my arm and led me south along the length of the wall. She was supportive as always of course, pretending to understand what she did not. I think she noticed that I must have looked disturbed, though she knew better than to say anything.

What troubled me in that moment was the realization that these people expected the afterlife. They expected me to lead them, to serve their needs. They expected never to hurt again, to never deal with the pain of loss, to never endure another moment of the miserable existence they had just left. The first of those to arrive (by accident) and assist us with the building of Cavarice had been discovered on the outskirts, so I could only assume the entire crowd of 9,000 had trekked north across the desert. To the Promised Land, perhaps. To the Shining City on a Hill. To whatever conception their minds had of heaven, Cavarice would have to be it.

And so I had to follow through on the promise I had made in 1906. If nothing else, perhaps I owed it to the lives lost during First Crossover. But I had to dress it up. I had to make Viktorium a place worth believing in. I had to make sure there was no such thing as death anymore, so long as I remained in charge. And if it turned out that there was indeed a death in this place, well…I had to be sure the city would never learn of it. I myself did not wish to hear such a thing.

Is there a “heaven”? I do not know anymore, nor do I care to.                                            

Viktorium shall be the only life I live from now on. There will be no going home anymore. Not while I have someone loyal by my side to share a new love with, and an expectant country to lead. My wife and children are enough of a regret, but at least they will be well taken care of on Earth. Let me say now that I have died, that I may live. A most noble cause.

Such childish ‘realizations’, as he calls them, were of course the hallmark of DuPont’s egotism. In truth, he cared not who he abandoned or what he left behind. The whole of Viktorium was but a dreamer’s utopian paradise to him. It also seems to be a tradition which, oddly enough, his successors have followed, be they Radical or Republican.

And that is precisely why it is so vital for everyone in Cavarice to be aware that this “dream worth believing in” is in fact nothing more than a lie meant to deceive us and every new arrival that comes after! And for what? Bodies to ensure the continued stability of this frequency? Viktorium is hardly worth saving, at least in my eyes. It is so far beyond, in fact, that our entire city and indeed, our entire world here is just as deluded—if not more so—than DuPont himself!

Consider how many people he roped into this scheme. Ever since First Crossover, we have been tricked and lied to. After the placement of the beacon, many of us were forced here against our greater will and against our religious beliefs. And what lies beyond this frequency? Don’t you want to know? Or are you content to remain blind, as Charles was?

Please do not think I ask these questions purely out of anger. Indeed, I am angry. But I am also much like you, the strong-willed everyday citizens of Cavarice who read my articles and feel so impassioned as to act. Every day, I get letters from many of you and I am truly thankful to find I am not the only one who believes we can do better as a city and as a world. Because just like you, I want to believe in this dream too. But I also want that dream to be genuine and pure of intention. I want political change in Cavarice. I want to see our old downtown districts revitalized, for the money and public services to flow freely to all, and most importantly, for our leaders to be passionate, strong people who care about all the lives under their watch, big and small.

But I must confess that if things do not change here soon, if they continue to remain as they are, and if the good people cannot stand up and make their voices heard out of fear of the bourgeoisie class or any other intimidating force…then I must resolve to find a way out. And I would encourage you all to do this same.

We were named ‘Viktorium’ for a reason; so if you must, please do all that you can to get out and embrace your own ‘victory over death’, whatever that dream may look like to you.

For if you do not, I assure you, you will die a second time.

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One thought on “The Workers’ Rebellion and The Great Facade: A Brief History of Viktorium (Part IV of V)

  1. “What troubled me in that moment was the realization that these people expected the afterlife. They expected me to lead them, to serve their needs. They expected never to hurt again, to never deal with the pain of loss, to never endure another moment of the miserable existence they had just left.”

    Damn. Those lines really hit me. It seems that the concept of failed expectations is starting to emerge as a major theme here.

    Also, I think I’m going to start referring to Laurent’s articles as “The Viktormarillion.”

    Like

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